The Notorious D.O.P.
the personal tumblr blog of cinematographer Matthias Saunders
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About: This is the personal blog of Matthias Saunders, a professional freelance cinematographer & filmmaker that has been working in the business for over 20 years.

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mattystanfield:

Please don’t scream.”

Maniac

Elijah Wood

Franck Khalfoun | 2012

Maxime Alexandre | Cinematography

mattystanfield:

"Does our subject still wear pink socks?"
Possession
Isabelle Adjani 
Andrzej Żuławski | 1981
Bruno Nuytten | Cinematography

mattystanfield:

"Does our subject still wear pink socks?"

Possession

Isabelle Adjani 

Andrzej Żuławski | 1981

Bruno Nuytten | Cinematography

372 plays

hitrecord:

What I Saw

wirrow (Global Curator) Featured Comment: ”beautiful song, maybe my favourite of yours. i think this could actually fit into the secrets theme.. and i think the video could potentially add its own interpretation to it”

==

Contribute to the “RE: SECRETS” collab HERE!

thefilmstage:

We explore Gone Girl and David Fincher's manipulation of trust:

“The sooner you look like yourself, the sooner you will feel like yourself.” People tell a lot of lies in Gone Girl, but perhaps none as big as that one. This is a film in which appearances and images of everything, from the big picture to the tiniest details, cannot be trusted.

In a way, then, Gone Girl is the film that Fincher has been working toward his entire career, placing the distrust of appearances of his early films and the shortcomings of images in his later work together in a way that projects its distrust directly onto the viewer.The Game puts a banker (Michael Douglas) into a staged alternate-reality that culminates in his inability to differentiate it from reality. Fight Club’s protagonists assert that society’s consumerist obsessions are turning us into commodities, only to reveal that the nameless narrator is himself not who we thought.

Fincher’s more recent and sophisticated films tend to ask these questions in less abstract and grandiose ways, looking at information and images rather than large statements about consumerism. Zodiac is a fight between analog and digital and ultimately the primacy of the former and the versatility of the latter. Characters are clumsily stuck trying to solve a killer’s riddles and Robert Graysmith (Jake Gyllenhaal) sees his efforts slowed as he digs through archives of information and scammers to meet contacts in person. All this is suggested by Fincher’s choice to shoot the film digitally—the blood, the city, and the information that creates its own plane on the image all show that digital technology is just as “real” and ultimately more versatile than clumsy analog partners. The Social Network approached it from the other direction, starting with faith in the digital image but gradually coming to doubt it. At the start, Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) loses (or rather throws away) Erica and is not tagged for Harvard’s prestigious final clubs. His reaction is to create Facebook, a digital projection of oneself at their greatest—the photos of parties, a clear marker of relationships, quadruple digit friend counts—so as to hide their own inadequacies. It ultimately fails Mark—even his digital self is lonely without Erica, and has he sits refreshing the page as the film draws to a close, the takeaway is that there are some lies that we can’t even get away with on the digital landscape.

Gone Girl goes furthest: whether it is one’s physical appearance, their demeanor, or their presentation on the news, one cannot trust what they see. Moreover, the film itself continues to reveal its own deceptions, and the cinematic image itself becomes fallible, subject to issues of timing and context that obscure the truth. Fincher’s films have struggled with how our reality — be it self-imposed or not — shapes us, and in Gone Girl they shape not just the characters, but the viewers. We unwittingly become just like the masses in the film rushing to cable news day after day. Like them, we don’t even know how crooked our vision is.

Continue reading.

(via davidfincher)

vizualize:

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers device to calculate exposure after an atomic blast, 1963.
Via sheaff ephemera

vizualize:

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers device to calculate exposure after an atomic blast, 1963.

Via sheaff ephemera

(via ilovecharts)

all-about-villains:

By Yeso

(via rubbish78)

weareking:

tomorrow!

weareking:

tomorrow!

(Source: gimb, via weareking)

Sequence 01 from Matthias Saunders on Vimeo.

justanothercinemaniac:

love-the-avenger:

rdj ice bucket challenge (or the sound of a million elephants)

With many people who are involved in movies and TV participating in the Ice Bucket Challenge, I thought it appropriate to reblog and handful of them for this blog. according to their website.

For those of you who don’t know, the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is meant to raise awareness towards the ALS association, “the only national non-profit organization fighting Lou Gehrig’s Disease on every front” according to their website. The Ice Bucket Challenge works like this: in good sport someone dumps a bucket of ice on their head and then challenges three other parties to do the same within 24 hours or else donate to the foundation. They then challenge three people in a “pay it forward” style event. Although the idea is you should only pay if you don’t take the challenge, taking the challenge still raises awareness for the organization and the disease.

If you want to see more celebrity videos, I found this website has a lot more then I will be posting: http://alsaicebucketchallengevideos.tumblr.com/

fuckyeahbehindthescenes:

Stephen King was paid $2,500 for the film rights.
Carrie (1976)

fuckyeahbehindthescenes:

Stephen King was paid $2,500 for the film rights.

Carrie (1976)

thepostermovement:

Inception by Grzegorz Domaradzki

thepostermovement:

Inception by Grzegorz Domaradzki

hnnhmcgrth:

Louis Armstrong plays for his wife, Lucille, in front of the Sphinx and Great pyramids in Giza, Egypt, 1961.

hnnhmcgrth:

Louis Armstrong plays for his wife, Lucille, in front of the Sphinx and Great pyramids in Giza, Egypt, 1961.

(Source: vintageblack2, via chinabluee)

fuckyeahdirectors:

Robert De Niro, Sandra Bernhard and Martin Scorsese on-set of The King of Comedy (1982)

fuckyeahdirectors:

Robert De Niro, Sandra Bernhard and Martin Scorsese on-set of The King of Comedy (1982)